MacMusic  |  PcMusic  |  440 Software  |  440 Forums  |  440TV  |  Zicos
acirc
Search

Minnesota cop awarded $585,000 after colleagues snooped on her DMV data

Sunday June 23, 2019. 01:19 PM , from Ars Technica
Enlarge / The most recent graduate from Ford's police academy, the Police Responder Hybrid Sedan.
In 2013, Amy Krekelberg received an unsettling notice from Minnesota’s Department of Natural Resources: An employee had abused his access to a government driver’s license database and snooped on thousands of people in the state, mostly women. Krekelberg learned that she was one of them.
When Krekelberg asked for an audit of accesses to her DMV records, as allowed by Minnesota state law, she learned that her information—which would include things like her address, weight, height, and driver’s license pictures—had been viewed nearly 1,000 times since 2003, even though she was never under investigation by law enforcement. In fact, Krekelberg was law enforcement: she joined the Minneapolis Police Department in 2012, after spending eight years working elsewhere for the city, mostly as an officer for the Park & Recreation Board. She later learned that over 500 of those lookups were conducted by dozens of other cops. Even more eerie, many officers had searched for her in the middle of the night.
Krekelberg eventually sued the city of Minneapolis, as well as two individual officers, for violating the Driver’s Privacy Protection Act, which governs the disclosure of personal information collected by state Departments of Motor Vehicles. Earlier this week, she won. On Wednesday, a jury awarded Krekelberg $585,000, including $300,000 in punitive damages from the two defendants, who looked up Krekelberg’s information after she allegedly rejected their romantic advances, according to court documents.
Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments
https://arstechnica.com/?p=1526003
News copyright owned by their original publishers | Copyright © 2004 - 2020 Zicos / 440Network
Current Date
Oct, Sat 24 - 06:00 CEST