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Microsoft engineer complains that company is biased against white men

Monday April 22, 2019. 07:12 PM , from Ars Technica
Enlarge (credit: Rory Finneren)
Some Microsoft employees are criticizing the company's efforts to increase hiring from under-represented demographics to make its staff more diverse, according to messages leaked to Quartz.
Threads started by an as-yet unnamed female program manager and posted on the internal Yammer message board in January and April assert that white and Asian men are being penalized or overlooked because of hiring practices that reward managers for hiring people outside of those groups. (Quartz hasn't named the employee who is apparently identified in the messages.) Further, the employee questions the value of diversity at all: 'Many women simply aren't cut out for the corporate rat race, so to speak, and that's not because of 'the patriarchy,' it's because men and women aren't identical.' She follows up that it is 'established fact' that the 'specific types of thought process and problem solving required for engineering of all kinds (software or otherwise) are simply less prevalent among women,' and that women simply aren't interested in engineering jobs.
Established fact?
Of course, these claims seemingly ignore troves of evidence showing how bias seeps into hiring and the workplace. Research has shown merely having a male name produces a more positive assessment of a job application, having a male presenter produces more positive reactions to pitches, and that managers skew their judgement criteria so as to favor men. Software developers who don't happen to be white and male are paid less than white men, and women, unlike men, are viewed negatively when they attempt to negotiate higher pay.
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https://arstechnica.com/?p=1494277

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